Contemporary theories of literacy

Contemporary theories of literacy

Global Literacies

 

Arthur, Ashton & Beecher (2014), Chapter 1

What are the key ideas?

Arthur, Ashton & Beecher (2014) Chapter 4

What are the key ideas?

Silvers, Shorey & Crafton (2010).
Analysis: What are the key ideas?

 

How do these ideas relate to what I already know? How have my ideas been extended, challenged, or changed?

Implications for practice: What are the practical implications for my work with children and families?
Arthur, Ashton & Beecher (2014), Chapter 2

 
Analysis: What are the key ideas?
How do these ideas relate to what I already know? How have my ideas been extended, challenged, or changed?

Implications for practice: What are the practical implications for my work with children and families?
Global Literacies Glossary

You are expected to develop your own glossary throughout the semester. We have suggested some terms for you to begin with. You should add other words and phrases as you come across them in your readings. Make sure these are terms that are relevant to literacy. You may want to keep a separate list for other new words that you come across in your readings that are related to education.

Include the author and date of the reading where you first came across this term and the page number so that you can go back to this later to check your understandings.

Make sure you date your entries. You will find that you will add to, change and clarify your definitions of these terms throughout the semester. Add a new date when you update your definition. You may also want to add a new reference when this is relevant to your new understandings.

Complete your own definition of literacy and globalisation based on your week 1 readings and then add at least one term each week.

Date Term Reference (Author, date, page number) Working definition – in own words
example bilingual

Barratt-Pugh (2000, p. 75) Someone is bilingual when they are able to speak two languages.
The implications for my work with children and families are:
Billingualism and multilingualism activity

What to do? After you have read the online notes and your readings, join in the online discussion on bilingualism and multilingualism.
Complete this discussion
Answer Why do children need to be critically literate? And What can adults do to support children’s critical literacy?

 

3. Go to the Week 2 discussion link, then to Group Discussion Board and respond to the discussion question: Why do children need to be critically literate? Before you post your reply read what others have written and then add to this discussion.

 

Leonie Arthur Instructor Manager
Why is critical literacy important for children? Why is critical literacy important for children?
COLLAPSE

Make sure you use your readings to support your arguments.
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06 March 2014 18:49:46 EST19 hours ago
Xin Zi 16695665
RE: Why is critical literacy important for children? RE: Why is critical literacy important for children?
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Parent Post
Because critical literacy aligns with the practice of social power. Quoting to Bourdieu’s theory to elaborate an early childhood literacy example, a student brings a DVD of his favourite movie (capital) to the classroom(field) to share with teacher and classmate(habitus). However, not every movie is acceptable to be played in class in front of everyone, continuing the example, the movie might adopt one or several racial descrimination scenes which use inpropriate languages to entertain the audience; however the form of a joke can easily be imitated by a child and the racial joke will be spread out. Maybe in the family, this child has got the permission from parents to bring his favourite DVD to share, for the parents are not sensitive with the discourse interpreted in the movie, but as a school teacher who is supposed to emphasize “equity” as a significant value, cannot encourage a racial descrimination take place in his or her class. Therefore we see the literacy from 2 different perspectives, families and educators own different social identities but what they have in common is the power to delivery the information to the children. And each single piece of information or knowledge is not neutral, without critial literacy, the social power might be abused to promote negative ideologies with a seeming ease.
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06 March 2014 22:27:11 EST16 hours ago
Jung Lee 17951555
RE: Why is critical literacy important for children? RE: Why is critical literacy important for children?
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Parent Post
Critical literacy is important for children in many ways. One example I would like to refer to Arthur, Ashton & Beecher (2014) chapter4 “Children are very interested in issues of power and in ways that texts are constructed to present particular worldviews and to position them as consumers of products and ideas, and are capable of analyzing text”. Children are exposed to popular culture and popular culture is often seen through advertisement and children instantly become consumers. Advertisement involves presenting a product in a variety of forms to attract the consumers to buy the product. Therefore this is considered as a form of literacy. Some advertisements often deliver meaning that is overly exaggerated. Children often believe the message delivered to them or disappoint them by breaking the beliefs they had. In terms of critical literacy, I want to point out that this is not only making children disappointed or fantasying the toys, it is the consequences children might have in their literacy development by absorbing misleading facts.
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07 March 2014 05:32:32 EST9 hours ago
Ljiljana Sokolic 17965688
RE: Why is critical literacy important for children? RE: Why is critical literacy important for children?
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Parent Post
Critical literacy is important for children as it fosters individual thinking, it enables children to question the values of dominant discourse (Diaz, Beecher & Arthur, 2007), for instance do girls always wear pink or boys blue as depicted so often in media and the popular culture. Since popular culture is so prevalent in early childhood, it can be used as a platform for opening up many discussions with children through which children can learn to critique media and consumer culture (Arthur, Ashton & Beecher, 2014; Diaz, Beecher & Artur, 2007). By engaging children in critical literacy, the parents and/or educators can help them feel empowered strenghtening their sense of agency and belonging. Further to that, critical literacy provide children with skills and knowledge about themselves in relation to ever changing consumer society (Carington, 2003 as cited in Diaz, Beecher & Arthur).

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4. Respond to the discussion question: What can adults do to support children’s critical literacy? Before you post your reply read what others have written and then add to this discussion
EXAMPLE OF STUDENT’S RESPONSE GET IDEAS AND COMPLETE MY ONE
The educators and the families can help children to support critical literacy in a variety of ways. One of them would be to engage children in discusions about significance of critical literacy in their lives (Diaz, Beecher & Arthur, 2007); by questioning children while reading them a book for instance, encouragining them to think beyond the square, widening their horizons of thinking by offering different endings to that book or a movie. When educator and children(likewise parent and a child) jointly analyse the text which can be either in print or digital form, that process of thinking together and exchanging information greatly increase children’s understanding of the ways in which the texts are constructed (Arthur, 2001). Popular culture is omnipotent in young children’s lives. Despite some resisistance to introducing popular culture and digital technologies in early childhood as a part of critical literacy, their inclusion could enable children to be engaged in critical analysis of ideologies presented in these texts (Arthur, 2001). However, educators need to be sensitive when approaching this issue with families as they may respond differently (depending of their approach to it) to the inclusion of popular culture and digital technology within early childhood setting (Diaz, Beecher & Arthur, 2007).
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